BlueGreen Alliance

Good Jobs, Clean Environment, Green Economy

Communications Workers of America

 "The key to creating quality, green jobs in the United States is making sure that working people have the right to form a union and bargain collectively so that they can negotiate a better workplace and a better life for their families.”

Larry Cohen, President, Communications Workers of America

 

The Communications Workers of America (CWA), the largest telecommunications union in the world, represents over 700,000 men and women in both private and public sectors, including over half a million workers who are building the Information Highway. CWA members work in telecommunications, broadcasting, cable TV, journalism, publishing, manufacturing, airlines, customer service, government service, healthcare, education and other fields.

CWA joined the BlueGreen Alliance in October of 2008, bringing its powerful voice to the effort to create secure sustainable jobs through the expansion of high-speed Internet and the revitalization the American economy through clean energy component manufacturing.

Making high-speed Internet affordable and widely available to all Americans has growing importance to our nation's education, healthcare, and economic development, especially in rural communities. By including universally accessible, high-speed Internet as an essential part of our energy plan, the United States can greatly reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions and spur economic growth by creating new environmental jobs.

In support of that effort, CWA launched Speed Matters, a campaign to make high-speed Internet available and affordable to all Americans. In 2010, the Communications Workers of America's Speed Matters project, along with the National Resources Defense Council, Sierra Club and the Blue Green Alliance, released a report, Networking the Green Economy: How Broadband & Related Technologies Can Build a Green Economic Future. 

Find out more about the BlueGreen Alliance’s work on Infrastructure and Workers' Rights.