Illinois

Join the BlueGreen Alliance

Help us identify ways to turn today’s environmental challenges into job-creating and economic opportunities!

Take Action

The BlueGreen Alliance in Illinois has a strong local membership of labor, environmental, and community organizations working towards creating good jobs, while protecting our environment. 

About the Illinois BlueGreen Alliance

We are guided by the principle that we can no longer choose between good jobs and a clean environment—that the actions we take to create quality jobs and to protect working people and the environment must go hand-in-hand, and that together, we will build clean, thriving and fair economy.

Our efforts center on the immediate need to develop commonsense solutions that protect the environment and create and maintain quality, family-sustaining jobs across the economy.
For more information on our work, contact Dick Breckenridge at dickb@bluegreenalliance.org.

Our Work

RECAP

Repairing the nation’s aging natural gas pipelines has the potential to create and support quality, family-sustaining jobs and drive billions in investment. The BlueGreen Alliance’s Repair Our Cities’ Aging Pipelines (RECAP) campaign was developed to accelerate the repair and replacement of this network. Large-scale investment will allow us to modernize our natural gas pipeline network and accelerate current efforts to repair America’s pipelines. This will enhance system reliability and ensure customers pay for the gas they actually use while creating and sustaining hundreds of thousands of new direct and indirect jobs, reducing the release of methane, and strengthening the economy by expanding the market for pipe manufacturing, fabrication, installation and operations.

A victory that is currently accelerating the repair and replacement of leak-prone pipe was the passage in Illinois of the Natural Gas Consumer, Safety and Reliability Act (SB2266) and an Amendment to the Public Utilities Act (HB3104), signed into law by Governor Pat Quinn in July 2013.

CLEAN, SAFE WATER

When we turn on the faucet, we expect that we’ll be drinking and using clean, safe water. As we’ve seen in Flint, Mich., and in cities around the country—including Chicago, Highland Park, Galesburg and many other in Illinois and around our nation—that isn’t always the case. There is lead in the water of many cities, schools and homes. And it is something we need to solve now, not later.

There’s an effort underway in Springfield to find these pipes and other infrastructure that needs to be modernized or replaced. The Illinois Senate has approved Senate Bill 550—a step forward in the fight for clean, safe water. This bill will also protect schoolchildren from lead poisoning by requiring testing of all drinking fountains and other sources of drinking water in our schools. These are strong first steps, and combined with action from local, state and federal leaders, it will begin to help Illinois reduce the potential of lead exposure in our water.

There are other benefits to taking action beyond making sure that our children are protected from the dangers of lead. Good middle-class jobs can be created and sustained cleaning up this mess. A recent report from the University of Illinois found that the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District that serves greater Chicago boosted the regional economy by $1.27 billion and created over 13,000 jobs in 2014. Increasing that investment also increases both the economic impact and the jobs impact.

“With a concerted effort, we can face and overcome this problem. In doing so, we will both protect communities and grow quality, family-supporting jobs here in Illinois and around the country.”

– Jack Darin, chapter director, Illinois Sierra Club and Rick Terven Jr., legislative and political affairs director, Illinois Pipe Trades Association.

Key Facts

Repairing natural gas distribution systems A victory that is currently accelerating the repair and replacement of leak-prone pipe was the passage in Illinois of the Natural Gas Consumer, Safety and Reliability Act (SB2266) and an Amendment to the Public Utilities Act (HB3104).